Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

The official journal of the Asian American / Pacific Islander Nurses Association (AAPINA), devoted to the exchange of knowledge in relation to Asian and Pacific Islander health and nursing care. 

Editor-in-Chief:

Hyochol Ahn, PhD, MSN, MS-ECE, MS-CTS, APRN, ANP-BC, FAAN, Associate Dean for Research and Professor, College of Nursing, Florida State University, USA


Created to fill the gap between nursing science and behavioral/social sciences, Asian / Pacific Island Nursing Journal (APINJ) offers a forum for empirical, theoretical and methodological issues related to Asian American / Pacific Islander ethnic, cultural values and beliefs and biological and physiological phenomena that can affect nursing care. APINJ publishes research on theoretical and methodological issues for populations, including Asian Americans, and research concerning Asian and Pacific Islanders as a sample. This journal will serve as a voice for nursing and other health care providers for research, education, and practice. 

All papers are rigorously peer-reviewed, copyedited, and XML-typeset. 

Asian / Pacific Island Nursing Journal (APINJ) is indexed in PubMedPubMed Central (PMC)DOAJScopus, Cumulated Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and International Academy of Nursing Educators (INANE) directory of nursing journals. 

 


Recent Articles

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Public Health for Asian/Pacific Islands

The prevalence and mortality rate of chronic kidney disease (CKD) are increasing year by year, and it has become a global public health issue. The economic burden caused by CKD is increasing at a rate of 1% per year. CKD is highly prevalent and its treatment cost is high but unfortunately remains unknown. Therefore, early detection and intervention are vital means to mitigate the treatment burden on patients and decrease disease progression.

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Super-Aging and Long-Term Care in Asian and Pacific Islander Health

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many community-based organizations serving Asian Americans pivoted to provide web-based care and social services. Asian American community leaders in the United States Pacific Northwest, including Asian Health & Service Center expressed that there are older immigrant adults who experienced backlash from discrimination, fear, and anxiety owing in part to anti-Asian hate and isolation, including from infection precautions. Pivoting supported staying safe from COVID-19 transmission and anti-Asian hate crimes.

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Professional Nursing Practice in Asian and Pacific Islander Health

Cultivating a positive research culture is considered the key to facilitating the utilization of research findings. In the realm of clinical nursing research, nurses conducting research may find the utilization of findings challenging due to the lack of a positive research culture.

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Reviews

The diversity of the world’s population is increasing, along with the health inequities of underrepresented minority populations. To provide high-quality care to all patients, nurses require an understanding of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) as well as how to implement best practices. Nurse educators are the ones to lead the way for DEI education for students.

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Public Health for Asian/Pacific Islands

The prevalence of diabetes in the United States is very high, and Chinese peoples with diabetes are estimated to comprise 50% of the total cases. Rates of diabetes continue to rise among Chinese and Chinese American people; however, research regarding effective diabetes interventions for this minority group is sparse.

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Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, Accessibility, and Belonging for Asian/Pacific Islands

The Philippines’ primary care is delivered via local health centers called barangay health centers (BHCs). Barangays are the most local government units in the Philippines. Designed to promote and prevent disease via basic health care, these BHCs are staffed mainly by barangay health workers (BHWs). However, there has been limited research on the social and environmental factors affecting underserved communities’ access to health care in underserved areas of the Philippines. Given the importance of BHCs in disease prevention and health promotion, it is necessary to identify obstacles to providing their services and initiatives.

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Super-Aging and Long-Term Care in Asian and Pacific Islander Health

Despite Chinese immigrants having a higher or comparable proportion of hypertension (HTN) compared to non-Hispanic White and Hispanic individuals, there are no effective technology-based intervention studies that target HTN management in Chinese immigrants in the United States.

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Super-Aging and Long-Term Care in Asian and Pacific Islander Health

Japan is a superaging society unparalleled in the world. Elderly people who need medical care do not receive adequate support in the community. As a new service to address this issue, a small-scale multifunctional in-home care nursing service called Kantaki was created in 2012. Kantaki, in collaboration with a primary physician, operates 24 hours a day and provides various nursing services (home visits, home care, day care, and overnight stays) to older people living in the community. The Japanese Nursing Association is working hard to promote this system; however, its low utilization rate is an issue.

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Editorial

ChatGPT, a trending artificial intelligence tool developed by OpenAI, was launched in November 2022. The impact of ChatGPT on the nursing and interdisciplinary research ecosystem is profound.

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Health Promotion for Asian/Pacific Islands

Vietnamese Americans have a relatively high risk of developing diabetes at younger ages, yet there are no published studies exploring their risk perceptions.

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Public Health for Asian/Pacific Islands

Korean immigrants are among the fastest-growing ethnic minority groups and make up the fifth-largest Asian group in the United States. A better understanding of the work environment factors and its impact on Korean American nurse and primary care provider (PCP) burnout may guide the development of targeted strategies to help mitigate burnout and workplace stressors, which is critical for the retention of Korean American nurses and PCPs to promote better alignment of national demographic trends and meet patients’ preference for cultural congruence with their health care providers (HCPs). Although there is a growing number of studies on HCP burnout, a limited number of studies specifically focus on the experience of ethnic minority HCPs, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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